Behind the Scenes:

Re-enactment Shoot

By Bruce Reichert

Jay and Pat filming.

You want to do what?! Bring the architect of the State Capitol, John Tourtellotte, back to life?!

 

The old Carnegie Library

The old Carnegie Library provided the perfect setting
for the resurrection of our architect extraordinaire.
The building was designed by the firm of
Tourtellotte & Hummel.

Inside the old Carnegie Library

The old Carnegie Library is currently the Huntley law office, a
spectacular place with interesting lighting challenges. Thanks to
their generosity, we re-arranged their work space for about 7 hours
during the evening, to create an architect's office.

 

Actor Mark Anthony Taylor prepares to become our John Tourtellotte.

Actor Mark Anthony Taylor prepares to become our
John Tourtellotte.

Director Pat Metzler considers his lighting options in a building drenched in sunlight.

Director Pat Metzler considers his lighting options in a building
drenched in sunlight.

 

Our actor at the local costume shop the week before.

Our actor at the local costume shop the week
before. Yikes! Bozo the Architect! Must be that hair!

Camera guy Jay Krajic shoots the action.

Okay, maybe we can still make this work, with a visit to the hair
stylist and some make-up help from Joan Cartan-Hansen. Camera
guy Jay Krajic shoots the action.

 

Gary Daniel and Jay Krajic with Royce Williams in the background.

The dueling cameras of Capitol Commission liaison
Gary Daniel and Jay Krajic.

Royce williams, Charles Hummel, Bruce Reichert with Jay Krajic.

Architect Charles Hummel, grandson of the co-designer of
the Capitol, shows Royce Williams and Bruce Reichert
original drawings of the building. In the early 1900's, no
one was better than the team of Tourtelllotte & Hummel
architects.

 

Gary Daniel and Jay Krajic with Royce Williams in the background.

Sauni Symonds, Bruce Reichert, Joan Cartan-Hansen and Joan Yost
compare notes.

Royce williams, Charles Hummel, Bruce Reichert with Jay Krajic.

Charles Hummel and Royce Williams pore
over 100 year old plans.

 

The ghost of John E. Tourtellotte enters the soul of our actor, MA Taylor.

Sometime during the evening, the ghost of
John E. Tourtellotte enters the soul of our actor. John
Tourtellotte used a dictaphone to record his thoughts
about the power of architecture to make us better
citizens.

Sauni Symonds

Editor Sauni Symonds looks on approvingly

 

The ghost of John E. Tourtellotte enters the soul of our actor, MA Taylor.

The actor delivers his lines... "the great white light of conscience must be allowed to shine, and by its interior illumination make clear the path of duty."